The way Lubbock police are approaching aggressive drivers seems a little counterintuitive.

Let's start with the fact that Lubbock police have always done me right. I think we did not give them enough of a raise. What bothers me is there seems to be better alternatives than the current program.

With the new campaign, an unmarked car (usually a car confiscated in a drug raid) will film an aggressive driver then a Lubbock Police Department cruiser will pull them over and present them with the evidence. If someone gets caught committing two or more violations, they'll get a bonus "stamp" on their ticket marking them as an aggressive driver and their fines will go up. I hope I have this correct; I've read this article four times and another twice to figure this thing out.

It's not that this program is necessarily bad, but it kind of reeks of a bureaucratic memo from somebody who isn't really on the streets. It's an OK-ish solution, but it overly complicates a much easier solution.

We all know the chill that seeing a cop car in traffic gives drivers. People usually won't even pass a slow cop car that's going under the speed limit. So why all the stealth, video, and after-the-fact enforcement? I think it would be better to just have two fully dressed police cars on the road rather than this weird game of cat-and-mouse.

This is just a thought. Maybe those confiscated cars could be sold to put more actual Lubbock Police Department cruisers on the streets. I commend the department for recognizing the problem; the solution just seems weird. It just makes more sense to stop traffic problems before they happen than to punish them after the fact.

Executed Death Row Inmates from the Texas Panhandle

The following individuals were convicted of Capital Murder for crimes committed in the Texas Panhandle (Amarillo and its surrounding areas) and sentenced to death by lethal injection. Read a brief summary on the area's executed Death Row inmates.

All information and photos have been taken from TDCJ and court records.

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